Check out mobile apps that pay you for running errands. If you have a smartphone, you can find a number of apps that hook you up with local businesses or people who need small tasks done for paid compensation. Not all the tasks pay very well, but they’re usually easy—for example, a business or marketing research company might pay you to take a picture of yourself at a certain establishment—and you can look at it like a kind of adventure or scavenger hunt.[8]
If you’re not sure you want to go all-in with an online store, try making some seasonal crafts during the holidays that are easy and require minimal investment. For example, you can gather mistletoe and/or pinecones, tie them into bunches with ribbons and cheap bells, and sell them as decorations. If it goes well and you enjoy the process, think about opening a more permanent storefront.
29. Videos – This could be an entire section on it’s own. Many people have made money by creating YouTube videos. Evan of EvanTube is a kid and he has made millions by creating reviews of products that other kids his age would use. It’s not easy to get views into the millions, but once you do, you’ll start seeing some cash come in. Many bloggers have completely turned to videos to get their point across by starting a video blog.
This is an awesome list. One thing I wish I had known when I had been making money in my teen years is that I could start an IRA. It would have added another decade of compounding, essentially, since I went to college and got my MBA as well. If your teen makes money they can contribute and thank you later for helping them on their journey to financial freedom as well.

Consider getting a separate bank account for your craft business. Ylva Bosemark, a teenage entrepreneur who sells her own jewelry designs, says: "I have a separate business bank account, because I have a surprising amount of business expenses. Everything I spend on the business comes from that account and all of the revenue goes into the account. It really helps me keep my business finances organized."
First of all, a concrete goal like yours is a great way to start your job hunt: you know exactly how much money you need and what you want to use it for, so you don't need any extra incentive to get out there and start earning. Start by writing down your monetary goal of $181.16 and then keeping track of any money you make along the way so you can monitor your progress toward that goal. After that, start your job hunt! If you don't have any local grocery stores or shops that will hire fourteen-year olds, ask your parents and family friends if you can start a babysitting gig or odd jobs like yard work. If that doesn't work, try getting your family together to have a yard sale or a bake sale. It probably won't make all the money you need in one go, but remember that every little bit helps you on your way to the magic number! Also start collecting soda cans and turning them into recycling centers in order to collect the 10-cent per can deposit. You'll be surprised how quickly little things like this can add up!http://www.thepennyhoarder.com/collecting-cans/
Plus, you can use another free app called Paribus. This price-tracking app negotiates a refund if something you buy goes on sale. Want an example? Let’s say you buy a tv, and it goes on sale three days later. You can get a price protection refund. Using Paribus is an easy way to monitor shopping purchases. Let’s face it, most of us don’t know about these claims.
This type of side hustle should be pursued only by those who are extremely organized and able to multitask. Becoming a virtual assistant is no walk in the park, but it can earn you a moderately good income. As a virtual assistant, you'll be responsible for administrative work, including scheduling meetings, replying to emails, entering data and undertaking certain social media activities, among other tasks.
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